Visualizing (generalized) linear mixed effects models, part 2 #rstats #lme4

In the first part on visualizing (generalized) linear mixed effects models, I showed examples of the new functions in the sjPlot package to visualize fixed and random effects (estimates and odds ratios) of (g)lmer results. Meanwhile, I added further features to the functions, which I like to introduce here. This posting is based on the online manual of the sjPlot package.

In this posting, I’d like to give examples for diagnostic and probability plots of odds ratios. The latter examples, of course, only refer to the sjp.glmer function (generalized mixed models). To reproduce these examples, you need the version 1.59 (or higher) of the package, which can be found at GitHub. A submission to CRAN is planned for the next days…

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Visualizing (generalized) linear mixed effects models with ggplot #rstats #lme4

In the past week, colleagues of mine and me started using the lme4-package to compute multi level models. This inspired me doing two new functions for visualizing random effects (as retrieved by ranef()) and fixed effects (as retrieved by fixef()) of (generalized) linear mixed effect models.

The upcoming version of my sjPlot package will contain two new functions to plot fitted lmer and glmer models from the lme4 package: sjp.lmer and sjp.glmer (not that surprising function names). Since I’m new to mixed effects models, I would appreciate any suggestions on how to improve the functions, which results are important to report (plot) and so on. Furthermore, I’m not sure whether my approach of computing confident intervals for random effects is the best?

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